Nursing Diagnosis for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia BPH

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), also known as benign prostatic hypertrophy, is a histologic diagnosis characterized by proliferation of the cellular elements of the prostate. Cellular accumulation and gland enlargement may result from epithelial and stromal proliferation, impaired preprogrammed cell death (apoptosis), or both. BPH involves the stromal and epithelial elements of the prostate arising in the periurethral and transition zones of the gland. The hyperplasia presumably results in enlargement of the prostate that may restrict the flow of urine from the bladder.

BPH is considered a normal part of the aging process in men and is hormonally dependent on testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) production. An estimated 50% of men demonstrate histopathologic BPH by age 60 years. This number increases to 90% by age 85 years; thus, increasing gland size is considered a normal part of the aging process.

Nursing Diagnosis for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

  1. Pain (acute/chronic) related to spasm of the sphincter muscle.
  2. Sleep pattern disturbance related to pain / effects of surgery
  3. Urinary retention related to obstruction, urethral pressure
  4. Risk for infection
  5. Anxiety related to of changes in health status

Nursing Diagnosis

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