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Nursing Diagnosis for Hypertension

Nursing Diagnosis for Hypertension

Nursing Diagnosis for Hypertension Nursing Care Plan for Hypertension

High blood pressure; HBP; Blood pressure - high


Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure.
Blood pressure is a measurement of the force against the walls of your arteries as the heart pumps blood through the body.
Blood pressure readings are measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg) and usually given as two numbers -- for example, 120 over 80 (written as 120/80 mmHg). One or both of these numbers can be too high.
The top number is your systolic pressure.

  • It is considered high if it is over 140 most of the time.
  • It is considered normal if it is below 120 most of the time.
The bottom number is your diastolic pressure.
  • It is considered high if it is over 90 most of the time.
  • It is considered normal if it is below 80 most of the time.
Pre-hypertension may be considered when your:
  • Top number (systolic blood pressure) is between 120 and 139 most of the time, or
  • Bottom number (diastolic blood pressure) is between 80 and 89 most of the time
If you have pre-hypertension, you are more likely to develop high blood pressure.
If you have heart or kidney problems, or if you had a stroke, your doctor may want your blood pressure to be even lower than that of people who do not have these conditions.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov


Nursing Diagnosis for Hypertension
  1. Risk for Decreased Cardiac Output related to increased afterload, vasoconstriction, myocardial ischemia, ventricular hypertrophy
  2. Pain: headache related to increased cerebral vascular pressure
  3. Ineffective Tissue perfusion : cerebral, renal, cardiac related to circulatory disorder
  4. Knowledge Deficit related to lack of information about the disease process and self-care


Nursing Diagnosis for Hypertension
Nursing Care Plan for Hypertension

Nursing Diagnosis Intervention

 
 
 

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